Archive for the ‘English’ Category

Don’t like trucks?

Tuesday, November 26th, 2019

Sudden violence of obviousness ;-)

20 cognitive biases that screw up your decisions

Sunday, October 27th, 2019

From Samantha Lee and Shana Lebowitz in Business Insider

The other side

Thursday, October 24th, 2019

Text by Sophie Fontanel (@SophieFontanel)

Make sure you’re always on the other side—by which I mean also on the other side. Don’t listen to those who insist you should take sides; as you know, a side is only one side. Cultivate uncertainty, which is synonymous with freedom, and also gentleness—put your hands over your ears when people tell you that gentleness is a weakness. Carry on being unsure; it’s better than being a safe bet. Read books by people whose opinions you don’t share; read Paul Morand’s Journal inutile and recognize its limitations; try to understand arguments that antagonize you, even if you take pride in being on the right side, and are wise to be so.

Take me (you never know, the example might be instructive): I live my life on both sides. In my case, it revolves around literature. I’m puzzling to people, because I write novels while cultivating a passion for the trivial world of fashion. I have carved out my career in both worlds, without ever once taking either milieu seriously. As a novelist, I look at fashion as if it were made out of words. As a fashion critic, I look at the literary world through its style, and not just for the clothing (far from it!). This path that I have chosen to follow makes everything more difficult; I can’t seek refuge in the safety of a single world, and it is an uphill struggle for me to gain recognition from my peers. But in the end, by dint of being different, you manage to invent something new. All my life I have lived on the other side, and I have learned something very simple that should have been blindingly obvious: on the other side, you get a better view. That’s what being an artist is about. Life has opened my eyes to that.

Original text (in French) here

Convenor

Friday, September 20th, 2019

 

Change: When to Engage?

Wednesday, September 18th, 2019

 

Birmingham Life Expectancy

Wednesday, September 11th, 2019

Stunning picture that shows how life expectancy changes across Birmingham by train station stop.

So much to say (beyond "for God sake, go North"). Of course, the 10 years discrepancy coming from life style is already well known, but such a "train stations distribution" is quite brutal.

WHO will make the change happen?

Tuesday, September 10th, 2019

Helen Bevan (@helenbevan) excels at producing evidence on the best ways to "rock the boat" (and the boat she has to instill change into is a huge rusted vessel). Here are two recent illustrations, along with her comments.

Often in big change initiatives, we focus on the people with power in the formal system. Yet the people who can make or break the change are typically a completely different set of people. We need to work with both. Thanks @LeandroEHerrero for the inspiration.

I would like to shift the balance in leadership thinking from inward to outward mindset (& have a system that rewards an outward mindset).

Q & A

Monday, June 24th, 2019

I was just asked by a colleague how I facilitate Q & A sessions—I guess the word is out that I am very deliberate about how an academic Q & A should go after a talk or panel. I think of this as an Indigenous feminist approach to facilitating academic Q & A.

Ever since I was in graduate school, I thought I hated giving public talks. But I soon realized it’s not the presentation, but the Q & A that can feel so awful. Academic audiences can be arrogant, hostile, and self-absorbed.

People don’t always bring their best selves to the Q & A—people can act out their own discomfort about the approach or the topic of the talk. We need to do better. I believe in heavily mediated Q & A sessions.

Before I give a talk, I ask my host to please find someone to facilitate the Q & A. It is better for someone who knows the people in the audience to choose who gets to ask questions in public, because they know who is a bully, who to avoid, who will derail a conversation.

The tips in this thread are both what I do after my own talks, and what I do when I am chairing a session. I especially do this for graduate students and early career scholars.

I make it clear that it is the audience’s responsibility to help craft a positive public speaking experience for graduate students and early career scholars. I tell the audience to help keep the good experience going and tell them not to ask violent questions.

Right after I am finished talking or all the panelists have shared their papers, I invite the audience to take 5-10 minutes to talk to each other. After 45-70 minutes of listening, people are bursting to talk, and taking the time to turn to talk to a neighbor keeps the first question from being from a person who just felt the urgency to talk. Also, I often need a breather and a moment to drink water or even step out to use the washroom.

So, I give the audience 5-10 minutes to talk to a neighbor. I suggest that they use the time to peer review their questions.

I say that this is a time for them to share a question they are considering posing in the Q & A, and that they should
a) make sure it is really a question;
b) make sure they aren’t actually trying to say that THEY should have given the paper;
c) figure out if the question needs to be posed and answered in front of everyone;
d) I remind the audience that the speaker has just done a lot of work, so they should figure out if their question is asking the speaker to do work that really the question-asker should do.

Then, after 5-10 mins, I will sometimes ask for the first question to come from particular people in the room— Indigenous graduate students, etc.
Or, if opening it up for anyone to begin, I will ask, "did you peer review your question?" before the person takes the mic.

People kind of laugh it off, but once they realize that I am serious–that the expectation is that they are thoughtful about the quality of their question and whether it really needs to be asked–it often helps to make the conversation much more satisfying.

We often treat Q & A as something that is to be endured, and are willing to gamble on it not going well by having very passive facilitation. We can shift how we interact with one another and make it better. Thanks to Daniel Heath Justice @justicedanielh for asking about this!

Wikipedia extends your mind

Saturday, March 30th, 2019

Yet another great XKCD.

The sound of a vinyl record player amid rubble and dust in Aleppo

Friday, March 1st, 2019

The man who sits on the edge of his bed, amid the rubble and dust, pipe in hand and legs crossed, listening to a record player is Mohammed Mohiedin Anis also known as Abu Omar.

The AFP photographer who captured this moment in Aleppo is Joseph Eid.

Personal Knowledge Mastery

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019

PKM by Harold Jarche (@hjarche). More at https://jarche.com/.

Anonymous for fifteen minutes

Friday, December 28th, 2018

Manchester Morning Graffiti

Woolsey Fire

Saturday, November 10th, 2018

This amazing picture is a pretty good demonstration that the end of the world can look great. Keep on living like there is no climate issue, brave American people, there is more beauty of this kind ahead.

From a tweet by LA County Sheriff’s (@LASDHQ)

Photo by Grant Denham (@GrantDenham)

The Creative Process Crossroads

Friday, October 26th, 2018

Comic by Wiley Miller (@TheWileyMiller).

Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Mammography Screening

Sunday, September 30th, 2018

Isn’t it high time this kind of program is stopped?

Source Harding Center for Health Literacy

America

Friday, September 28th, 2018

America today is typically no longer the dream place it once was.

Things that happen in Silicon Valley and also the Soviet Union

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

Great Twitter thread by Anton Troynikov (@atroyn)

Things that happen in Silicon Valley and also the Soviet Union:

  • waiting years to receive a car you ordered, to find that it’s of poor workmanship and quality
  • promises of colonizing the solar system while you toil in drudgery day in, day out
  • living five adults to a two room apartment
  • being told you are constructing utopia while the system crumbles around you
  • ‘totally not illegal taxi’ taxis by private citizens moonlighting to make ends meet
  • everything slaved to the needs of the military-industrial complex
  • mandatory workplace political education
  • productivity largely falsified to satisfy appearance of sponsoring elites
  • deviation from mainstream narrative carries heavy social and political consequences
  • networked computers exist but they’re really bad
  • Henry Kissinger visits sometimes for some reason
  • elite power struggles result in massive collateral damage, sometimes purges
  • failures are bizarrely upheld as triumphs
  • otherwise extremely intelligent people just turning the crank because it’s the only way to get ahead
  • the plight of the working class is discussed mainly by people who do no work
  • the United States as a whole is depicted as evil by default
  • the currency most people are talking about is fake and worthless
  • the economy is centrally planned, using opaque algorithms not fully understood by their users

Welcome to America

Thursday, June 21st, 2018

To Try List

Monday, May 21st, 2018

Two sketchnotes by Dani DiPirro (@positivepresent).

Planet or Plastic?

Thursday, May 17th, 2018


css.php